“Please don’t make me bite you”: A dog’s eye view of dog bite prevention

Posted on May 21, 2014May 31, 2022Categories NewsTags   Leave a comment on “Please don’t make me bite you”: A dog’s eye view of dog bite prevention

This week is Dog Bite Prevention Week, and here’s something that most press releases, websites, and lists of do’s and don’ts may not mention: Dogs will do their part to prevent dog bites. All they need is a little help from us. That dog in front of you doesn’t want to bite you. Even if the situation pushes him beyond the remarkable scope of his species’ tolerance for human behavior and makes him feel he needs to defend himself, he … Continue reading ““Please don’t make me bite you”: A dog’s eye view of dog bite prevention”

No single factor explains barking, growling, lunging and biting behavior in dogs.

Posted on April 30, 2014May 31, 2022Categories Research & Publications   Leave a comment on No single factor explains barking, growling, lunging and biting behavior in dogs.

Dr. Rachel Casey from Bristol University in the UK, and colleagues, recently attempted to estimate the number of dogs barking, lunging, growling or biting – the behaviors they grouped together under the term, aggression[1] — and to see if they could identify decisive causes of such behavior. Of more than 14,000 UK dog owners surveyed, 3,897 replied, answering questions about their dogs’ responses to family members, to unfamiliar persons away from the house where the dog lived, and to unfamiliar … Continue reading “No single factor explains barking, growling, lunging and biting behavior in dogs.”

Assumptions about future behavior of shelter dogs seen as food aggressive are unfounded.

Posted on August 30, 2013May 31, 2022Categories News, Research & PublicationsTags   Leave a comment on Assumptions about future behavior of shelter dogs seen as food aggressive are unfounded.

Animal shelters may conduct what they describe as behavioral evaluations of the dogs they receive, in order to discover what they presume will be problem behaviors when the dogs are adopted into new homes. Among the behaviors that evaluations are designed to detect are those labeled “food aggression.” The behaviors described by that term include growling, showing teeth, lunging, snapping or biting, when a person attempts to interact with the dog while it is eating, or to interfere with the … Continue reading “Assumptions about future behavior of shelter dogs seen as food aggressive are unfounded.”

Of Mice and Dogs: Their Personalities May Be Up To Us

Posted on June 17, 2013March 18, 2021Categories News, Research & Publications   Leave a comment on Of Mice and Dogs: Their Personalities May Be Up To Us

Most of us easily acknowledge the likelihood that specific behaviors can be influenced by learning, in ourselves and in other species, including the one closest to us, our companion dogs.  We can learn to tie our shoes, and our dogs can learn to walk next to us. We can even learn rules of etiquette and our dogs can learn to greet people without jumping up. But we also identify ourselves as having overarching traits, as having a fixed personality that … Continue reading “Of Mice and Dogs: Their Personalities May Be Up To Us”

NCRC Video Interview with Janis Bradley

Posted on April 10, 2013March 18, 2021Categories UncategorizedTags ,   Leave a comment on NCRC Video Interview with Janis Bradley

Janis Bradley, veteran dog trainer and author of the NCRC Vision Series publication, ‘The Relevance of Breed in Selecting a Companion Dog,’ discusses whether breed is a useful indicator of the suitability of a companion dog. Click to view other NCRC Video interviews. 

Study underscores that we can only learn what dogs are capable of from capable dogs.

Posted on January 29, 2013May 31, 2022Categories Research & Publications   Leave a comment on Study underscores that we can only learn what dogs are capable of from capable dogs.

The human community has changed dramatically in the modern era.  Both dogs and people are continually adjusting to new phenomena (trains, cars, streets teeming with other people and other dogs, to name a few) and new expectations that arise from our living in closer proximity to each other. It’s challenging enough for people. How do the dogs do it? New expectations for dogs – and for people – have arisen from our living in closer proximity to each other in … Continue reading “Study underscores that we can only learn what dogs are capable of from capable dogs.”

The quality of a dog’s relationship to humans is a crucial determinant of social behavior

Posted on March 28, 2012March 18, 2021Categories Research & Publications   Leave a comment on The quality of a dog’s relationship to humans is a crucial determinant of social behavior

Note: This blog was originally written in 2012, the below document was updated in 2016 to reflect the most recent research.   For almost 2 decades, The Family Dog Project has been at the forefront of research demonstrating that dogs have a special ability that few other animals possess: to notice and respond to social signals from humans. Jozsef Topál and his colleagues have discovered that this canine ability to connect with humans is enhanced, if not determined, by the … Continue reading “The quality of a dog’s relationship to humans is a crucial determinant of social behavior”