Resources designed to prepare law enforcement for encounters with dogs while on duty:


Police and Dog Encounters: Tactical Strategies and Effective Tools to Keep our Communities Safe and Humane (Video Series)

National Canine Research Council has funded and developed, in partnership with Safe Humane Chicago & the U.S. Department of Justice: Office of Community Oriented Policing Services, a five-video series designed to prepare law enforcement officers for interactions with dogs in the line of duty. Much like the manual, this video-series is about staying safe, in order to protect law-enforcement officers, residents nearby, and dogs encountered in the line of duty.

Police and Dog Encounters is a resource that:

  • shows officers how to recognize the signs a dog may be present, how to avoid unnecessary encounters with dogs, and how to distinguish between warning signals and signs of friendliness when they must enter a dog’s space;
  • teaches simple techniques that help officers see the effect of body language on a dog’s behavior; and
  • provides training in effective responses to genuinely volatile situations, in order to avoid the worst case scenarios—being injured by a dog or shooting one.

For additional information on the video series, please read "When Police and Dogs Meet": 

View the Video Series Police and Dog Encounters online for FREE:

http://cops.igpa.uillinois.edu/resources/police-dog-encounters

Law enforcement agencies may contact info@ncrcouncil.com for a free DVD copy of the video series: Police and Dog Encounters.

The Problem of Dog-Related Incidents and Encounters (Manual)

This manual for law enforcement officers is a publication of the U.S. Department of Justice Office of Community Oriented Policing Services. This collaborative manual was authored by National Canine Research Council, Best Friends Animal Society, Safe Humane Chicago, and the University of Illinois Center for Public Safety and Justice. 

The Problem of Dog-Related Incidents and Encounters offers a valuable framework for effective response strategies to any situation where a dog is present. Officers learn how to assess a dog’s environment, distinguish between warning signals and signs of friendliness, and which of their actions can calm a tense, uncertain situation. The authors illustrate their points with drawings and photographs of a variety of common canine postures and also include case studies to reinforce the recommendations for best practices. In addition to discussing how to maintain appropriate control when encountering a dog, special instructions are included for those who evaluate and report on dog-related incidents. 

Law enforcement agencies may contact info@ncrcouncil.com for free hard copies of the booklet The Problem with Dog-Related Incidents and Encounters.
 

Updated April 7, 2016.